FEATURED WORK



 

ELYTRON


An Elytron is one of the two wing cases of a beetle. This is the first piece in a series of AR artworks I’m making to explore veils and headdresses in tandem with organic matter. I used Spark AR studio to create this work. 

The model I constructed takes inspiration from the structure of the Macedonian Igla - which is a piece of jewelry thats worn on your head. It features six different types of beetles that I modeled and textured based off of photo references. This effect specifically plays on the protective nature of veils both socially and practically, and draws that parallel with a beetles hardened exterior - also beetles are super cool.





Ralph Lauren


I began working at Ralph Lauren right after I graduated from New York University. I was a digital production artist, working in tandem with the design and development teams, as well as the project management team and team leads.

I optimized assets for the global website, created an editing workflow for the video loops that appear on site, processed email designs, designed affiliate ads that were served to millions, and aided the innovation team. 

I worked sprints on innovation projects creating 3D assets and textures, as well as ideated and created concepts for AR experiences on our social channels.





Odmor


For my final capstone if my undergraduate track in Integrated Digital Media, I decided to create a wearable and app combination that works to ease the effects of panic attacks and anxiety. I called this project Odmor, which means rest in Macedonian. My goal with Odmor was to create a wearable and app combination that guides user through deep breathing exercises in order to calm the overwhelming feeling associated with panic attacks and generalized anxiety.

In order to achieve this I used Maya to build 3D models, and to animate those 3D models, in order to make them expand and contract. I created a wearable in the form of a ring with a trigger image on top, and used Unity and Vuforia to place my animation on top of the ring. I published an app using Unity, in order to make the animation appear on the wearable for users who hold the phone over the ring. The instructions in app are very simple, users only need to breathe in when the animation expands, and breathe out when the animation contracts. My friend who is an audio engineer created a track especially for me that matches up with the rhythm of my animation. The music gently plays on a look while users breathe in and out in rhythm.

The goal of the app is for it to make itself obsolete, eventually people will memorize this technique on their own and can keep the wearable as a physical item of comfort.





Bop It!


I don’t make many games on my own so recreating my beloved childhood toy as an AR game was a very fun challenge. One challenge I see frequently in the AR space is the need to communicate with the user or guide them on how to navigate an effect in an organic way. It’s also important to take into account that effects on social platforms get served to an international audience, so a good way to make sure everyone understands your instructions is to use iconography or little animations. I modeled this Bopit based off of ebay photos since my bopit is back at home with my parents.

Setting up the logic to make a game that progressively gets harder as you get points and time moves forward was a fun challenge for me, as well and coming up with icons and flourishes to make sure users understood the game play and enjoyed it!

If you’re interested in how I made this, I made a “tutorial”!! I put that in quotes because it is two hours long, and even I havent watched the whole thing in one sitting - grab your popcorn and watch it here!